5 Things I’ve Learnt From Studying Fashion Buying So Far

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I’m currently studying Fashion Buying at university, and thought i would share 10 things I’ve learnt about studying a fashion business course so far. Fashion is always so misunderstood as something that is purley design, and the more business side of it is rarely spoken about. So, I thought i would highlight the side of fashion people don’t always see and to show any of you that are thinkng about a career in fashion, another great way to be a part of the fashion industry.

  1. Being a Fashion Buyer is a big job– Until you start studying fashion buying i don’t think you really have any idea how big of a job it actually is, I didnt even realise and I chose to study it. It might seem like you just get a design, buy fabric, go on insirational trips and get the product made; but there is so much time, effort, dedication and managing to do to create one range for a store.
  2. It really helps to have a background in business- I studied Economics with business at A-Level and I honestly couldn’t recommend enough to have some form of experience in business before you study a fashion buying course. So many of the terms and ideas that come up in my lecture’s i’ve heard about before and learnt, so it makes it so much easier for me to apply them to fashion and retail. It also helps you with ideas about profit margins, marketing, how businesses grow and so much fundamental knowledge you can use for the course.
  3. You need to have a brain to be a fashion buyer– This isn’t something i didnt already know before starting the course, however it’s something so many people think is true. When you say you study fashion so many people think it’s an easy route to uni and that you don’t really have a brain, however it’s the complete opposite. You would’nt exist in the industry without a smart business brain, that knows what it’s doing and has a real drive to succeed.
  4. The assignments are so diverse– This might just be for my course, but every single one of my assignments are so different. I do sketch books, essays, little phase tests, illustrator and photo shop assignments, reports and even a blog to create in the first year. Not only is this so interesting to get your teeth into, but is also so good to learn vital skills for the industry and for my job in the future.
  5. I would recommend it to anyone who wants a different route into fashion– I always wanted to work in fashion, but knew fashion design was never really a route for me. So, finding out there was some amazing fashion business courses in the country that I could do instead of fashion design was great for me, and i would honestly recommned it to anyone. It’s so interesting, relevant and perfect for any fashion lover.

Are you thinking about studying fashion in the future?

Rachel x

10 Ways to Nail Your Revision This Exam Season

10 Ways to Nail Your Revision

Exam season and revision is a massive part of any students year, whether your doing your GCSE’s, A-Levels or your finishing your year at university. It’s a time that so many of us hate and utterly dread, but it’s your final obstacle to face before you can have the most amazing summer. I’m sure that revision is implanted in most of your brains at the minute and you’re constantly trying to find more hours in the day to tick off that revision to do list. So, I’m sharing 10 ways that you can nail your revision this exam season, and make sure that you smash those end of year exams…

1.Get Organised- Before you do any revision it’s super important that you make sure you know what you actually need to revise. Something I’ve done is got a separate revision notebook for each subject and then written a check list of the topics I need to cover. Then I know what’s on the spec and can tick it off when I’ve done it.

2. Be Realistic- We’re all culprits of doing this, but it’s so important that you stay realistic with how much revision you can do in one day. 3/4 topics is usually my limit, especially if I plan it around my social life and having regular breaks to just completely take my mind off revision.

3. Short bursts of time- Most people work best in short busts of time, so 35-45 minutes and then have a break for 30 minutes or so. That way you stay engaged and interested in what your revising and not just turn off and have to go over the same topics again when you can’t remember anything.

4. New surroundings- As much as I love being at my desk to revise and having everything I need around me, sometimes this is really unproductive and demotivating. So, go somewhere new, maybe a friend or relatives house, a café, library or even just another room in your house; so you don’t feel so trapped by your revision.

5. Leave time- The best way to make sure you don’t get overwhelmed and stressed out is just to make sure you leave time to revise. Don’t start one or two weeks before your exam, but leave 7/8 weeks instead and then you don’t have to do so much revision every week. You can do it more slowly and in chunks.

6. Variety- This is so key to making sure you don’t get bored by your revision, even if it is making you want to kill your self. So, watch videos, make mind maps, write notes and talk over topics with friends in your class, so you can engage with your revision.

7. Colour- This doesn’t work for everyone, however if your creative and want to make your revision more interesting to look at, then I love to use colour. Before I make any mind maps I always empty out my pencil case, with coloured pens and highlighters so that I can use them whilst I’m revising. I love making everything look pretty, so this is the perfect technique to engage me in my revision.

8. Snacks- When your revising and using a lot of brain power, it’s essential that you have some food to keep you motivated and alert. Chocolate is perfect for a bit of sugar rush and to satisfy that sweet craving, but I also love having a banana. I just think they really boost my concentration and give me some motivation when I feel tired of revision and have still got lots to do.

9. Start from the beginning- When I’m revising I always like to start from the beginning and then work through all the topics. Not only does this ensure you know all the content, but it also just seems more logical to me and makes sure I don’t get confused on what is on each of my exams.

10. Past Exam Questions- Knowing the content is just one part of the exam, you also need to know how to answer the questions and the type of answers the exam board are looking for. So do lots of practice exam questions and ask your teacher to mark them. This way you can practice the type of questions you will have in the exam and can also get feedback on what you don’t understand or are getting wrong.

I hope some of these tips will help you ease the pain of revision and help you nail your exams.

Rachel x